The internet as TV? Pass me the remote, get out the credit card…

Internet NO será otra TV
Internet NO será otra TV, click to see larger version, or see original at http://internetnoseraotratv.net/en

Image above via Transmedia

“I’m not nearly as upset with the fact that there is such a thing as the iPad, I am not necessarily an iPad hater, rather my contempt is preserved for all the folks who are claiming that the iPad is the second coming of educational technology.” – Jim Groom

“For a company whose CEO professes a hatred of DRM, Apple sure has made DRM its alpha and omega. Having gotten into business with the two industries that most believe that you shouldn’t be able to modify your hardware, load your own software on it, write software for it, override instructions given to it by the mothership (the entertainment industry and the phone companies), Apple has defined its business around these principles. It uses DRM to control what can run on your devices, which means that Apple’s customers can’t take their “iContent” with them to competing devices, and Apple developers can’t sell on their own terms. ” – Cory Doctorow

“A federal appeals court on Tuesday dealt a sharp blow to the efforts of the Federal Communications Commission to set the rules of the road for the Internet, ruling that the agency lacks the authority to require broadband providers to give equal treatment to all Internet traffic flowing over their networks.” – F.C.C. Rules for Broadband Fairness Set Aside by Court (New York Times)

“We write in the box that Google gives us.” — Douglas Rushkoff, Program or be Programmed

8 thoughts on “The internet as TV? Pass me the remote, get out the credit card…

  1. I thought about tweaking your wording, so that your contempt was ‘reserved’ for the iPad ed tech zombies… but who am I to even think about editing The Bava?

  2. Fair enough Cole, I should watch the name-calling. (And I am reading your posts, counting on you to provide your take.)

    I have been disturbed by some discourse that seems like unpaid PR work on behalf of a company that doesn’t need it… I guess I am matching the hyperbole level, which doesn’t make it any more correct.

    As the other links here are meant to suggest, I don’t see this as an issue related to any one company or product. I suppose if I saw a fraction of the energy from ed techies on my Twitter feed providing pushback to ACTA or preserving net neutrality I’d be a little less frustrated and cranky.

  3. To tell you the truth I am continually amazed at we all jump into the mode of, “this will transform education” and on the other side,”this will destroy education” each time a shiny new tool arrives. Somewhere in the middle of those two poles is reality. I’m not excited about the iPad because of a perceived vender lock in … I am interested in what the form factor can do. I don’t care what my students put on them, although I prefer they get it whatever it is legally. I am interested in how we could use it collectively.

    It’s a bit odd, I’ve found myself not wanting to use it much in public because it seems to stir a very emotional response on both sides of the fence. We shall see … In the meantime let’s raise the level f discourse around net neutrality on the blogosphere so many can understand the potential downstream on that. All is not lost, but yesterday’s ruling is very unwelcome.

  4. The utopian/dystopian response to tech is pretty classic for American culture. We’ve done this back to the railroad days.

    Put another way, there’s a kind of Newtonian reaction to cults, or giant hype machines. (Did you see the two Newsweak covers?)

    I’d love to just asses the iPad as part of the ubicomp scene, along with the 20+ other new tablets, and the remaining tablet 1.0s, along with the zillion other devices (is there a competitor to LiveScribe yet). Hopefully the spasms and aftershocks will pass soon enough so I, and we, can do that.

    (You can’t trust me tonight – just drove through Boston)

  5. Cole,

    The fact is that the “New World Computing” post you referenced a little while back which frames the iPhones, and the larger, younger sibling as the birth of a new, undeniable breed of computing does strike me as very much part of the all or nothing idea.
    http://colecamplese.typepad.com/my_blog/2010/01/progress-is-hard.html?cid=6a00e54fe381ec88340128773c958e970c#comment-6a00e54fe381ec88340128773c958e970c

    And I am all about all or nothing, so I am not one to criticize, but I hate when we do it for corporations, just takes all the fun out of the passion 🙂

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